The Lab

  • SapoChromes Collab

    2011-2012 SAPochrome Collab Project

    Twenty-six participants from different corners of the world coming together to make a series of white paintings as meditations on the immaterial, the infinite, on light, . . .on nothingness.

    Amey Mathews, Angela Voulgarelis, Bodile Eide, Carla Repice, Cathy Bercusson, Elise Schonhowd, Fletcher Boote, Jamie Emerick, Jana Harper, Jessica Perl Houston, Joanna Grasso, Kirsten Stromberg, Lisa Knoop, Marcia Teusink, Mary Lamboley, Maya Pindyck, Melissa Morris, Michelle Magot, Michelle Prazak, Paulo Borges, Rebecca Szeto, Reem Rahim, Regan Wheat, Serioshka Hellmund, and Tracy Grubbs.

    Photo: twenty-six participants from different corners of the world coming together to make a series of white paintings as meditations on the immaterial, the infinite, on light, . . .on nothingness.  Amey Mathews, Angela Voulgarelis, Bodile Eide, Carla Repice, Cathy Bercusson, Elise Schonhowd, Fletcher Boote, Jamie Emerick,  Jana Harper, Jessica Perl Houston, Joanna Grasso, Kirsten Stromberg, Lisa Knoop,  Marcia Teusink, Mary Lamboley, Maya Pindyck, Melissa Morris, Michelle Magot, Michelle Prazak, Paulo Borges, Rebecca Szeto, Reem Rahim, Regan Wheat, Serioshka Hellmund, and Tracy Grubbs.
     

     

     

     

  • Believe

    Believe

    Technically, it's too early in the evening for insomnia to kick in (but it sure feels like it) . . . . some mental noodlings on the language of love and life (with a splash of German) before bed.

  • In a Parallel Universe

    In a Parallel Universe
    [From A&E's Hoarders Episode] My hoarder twin in the parallel universe. (only I carve my spirit sticks)
  • Finding Love

    Today (and everyday) find love in everything you do (even on the floor while vacuuming the house).

  • Wide Open Spaces

    Wide Open Spaces

    A quiet Pt. Reyes mini art retreat with Tracy Grubbs a week and a half ago. Getting better at the "landscape thing", feeling less overwhelmed by the details of "wide open spaces". (but I am a stubborn girl) Think the yupo paper Tracy gave me did most of the work here though. My interpretation of the view out the window (which by the way, looks nothing like the view out the window).

  • Venda Artist: Paul Thavanha

    Today, remembering someone I had the honor of working with and learning from during my residency in the Bush. Paul Thavanha, Chikudo ~ sp? is his real South African Venda name, which means "Little Pocket " (because he was born very tiny and could fit in a pocket)  RIP

    Paul, Thomas, Owen and David. Noria Mabasa's Venda Village, Limpopo Wilderness 2004

  • Making Amends

    An act of mending as a metaphor for forgiving.

    I have a lot of mending to attend to, starting with this little bird I found at a thrift store. Not exactly sure why, but felt compelled to keep it and repair it. It's taken me about 3 years to get around to it, . . . finally.

    BEFORE: Bird with the Broken Wing
    AFTER: At the Precipice.
    Interesting how a camera angle can affect mood.
    Still(flight) from the imaginary film: (re)Learning to Fly
  • The Pre-quel ( Déjà Vu )

    In reference to my last post, I just dredged up an old painting from circa 1999. Uncanny that there used to be a central figure in that painting too, and I also got rid of it.

    Again with the dark lump at the bottom of the composition, implied gravity, and a hand (though the older ones look to be waiting for something).

     

                    Stone's Throw                                            Scherzo

  • What makes a successful artwork?

    I was de-installing an ugly, be-laboured steel wool drawing I made last year, Scherzo (The Joke in Italian. Ref: the myth of the trickster, inspired by a chinoiserie jester on a swatch of fabric someone gave me.)

    CONCEPT: that creativity -the art part- is elsewhere. It's not the artwork itself, which is a container/medium for the message, but something -the essence- which is less tangible. [the jester points the way]
    I'd always loved the concept and the steely crumbs caught in the paper tray at the bottom much more than the actual drawing itself, which I found . . . so cloyingly literal, fussy and academic in its rendering.
    The more I de-installed that drawing,
    the more a new drawing was emerging on its own.
    Nearly all the pins came off and the jester began to sag {and seemed to exhale a sigh of relief}. . . .until he could no longer support his own weight (his own redundancy) and fell completely down. All that was left was the wrinkle of his simultaneous absence-presence and a telltale, pointing finger. Lovely performance-drawing, don't you think?
    QUESTION: What makes a successful artwork?
    ONE POSSIBLE ANSWER: Chance and Gravity(Gravitas).